LeBron James Grabs First NBA Title As Heat Trounce Thunder To Win 2012 Finals

There are some nights when winning is an option and a necessity. And then there are some nights when the other team won’t be denied and nothing can be done to stop it. After an assertive Game 5 performance that won LeBron James his first NBA championship, the Heat taught the Thunder exactly how helpless that feels. On a night where nothing went Oklahoma City’s way, the Heat took matters into their own hands and buried the Thunder with one of the more dominant third quarter runs in NBA Finals history. Between LeBron James putting up a triple-double and the Heat knocking down 14 3-pointers, the young and inexperienced Thunder had no chance as Miami closed out the series with a 121-106 win to end the series in five games on their home floor.

After taking a 3-1 series lead, history wasn’t on OKC’s side, as no team in NBA Finals history has ever comeback from that deficit to win the title. But Miami provided the exclamation point on that stat with an unstoppable shooting display in the third that stopped the Thunder’s comeback in its tracks and put the game out of reach before the fourth quarter even started. LeBron James was magnificent throughout and showed greater maturity and poise in Miami’s clincher, notching 26 points, 13 assists and 11 rebounds in an all-around impressive performance. But even more key was Miami’s 3-point shooting. After averaging just six 3-pointers per game during the season, the Heat dropped an astounding 14 on the Thunder in Game 5, led by Mike Miller’s incredible 7-of-8 shooting night from beyond the arc. Miller, who hadn’t made a 3-pointer in the entire series, finished with 23 points off the bench and provided the same critical spark from 3-point range that Shane Battier, Mario Chalmers and Norris Cole had given throughout the series. It almost seemed like the regular season was just one gigantic bluff from Miami’s reserve players, who suddenly became unstoppable 3-point threats in the Finals. Battier hit three threes to finish with 11, Chalmers hit two and added 10 points and Cole added his only triple to completely sink Oklahoma City’s hopes of sending the series back home for Game 6.

LeBron was terrific again, but Mike Miller’s contributions were nothing short of essential in Miami’s Game 5 win to take the crown.

Make no mistake, although the officiating was an issue at times during this series, it wasn’t in Game 5; the Heat definitely earned their championship and proved themselves to be the best team of the 2012 NBA Playoffs. LeBron James capped off one of the more magnificent postseason performances we’ve seen in the last decade with a triple-double that proved himself to be clutch in addition to illustrating how valuable experience is at this stage. And although the focus was all on LeBron, Dwyane Wade deserves a lot of credit for the Heat’s convincing victory over the Thunder in this series. Wade finished with 20 points and eight rebounds in Game 5, a huge lift for Miami after he struggled at times during the Heat’s postseason run. And Chris Bosh, the third member of Miami’s big three, showed just how important he is by clogging up the paint and finally finding his shooting touch. Bosh had 24 points, seven rebounds and two blocks, dominating Kendrick Perkins in the paint and making it difficult for Russell Wesbrook and Kevin Durant to score in the paint. Finally, Erik Spoelstra completely out-coached Scott Brooks. I’ve been one of many who have criticized Spoelstra for being an ineffective coach, but against the Thunder, his rotations were superior, forcing the Thunder to play small which gave the Heat a huge advantage on the perimeter. Between Miami’s big three playing consistently great basketball and Miami’s role players stepping up and hitting a multitude of perimeter shots, the Thunder had no chance.

Oklahoma City had a memorable run and looked like clear favorites in this series, but had problems scoring on Miami’s stifling defense under the immense pressure of playing in their first NBA Finals appearance. Experience was definitely a huge factor, as the Thunder looked like a very different team from the one that steamrolled Dallas, LA and San Antonio on their way to the Finals. Kevin Durant led all scorers with 32 points and and 11 rebounds, but it still wasn’t enough as Westbrook struggled after his amazing 43-point performance in Game 4. Westbrook finished just only 19 points on 4-of-20 shooting. Durant also didn’t get much help from James Harden, OKC’s Sixth Man of the Year who shied away from the spotlight for the majority of the series. Harden finished with 19 points, but most of them came in garbage time when the outcome of the game was all but decided. Derek Fisher showed up, adding 11 points off the bench, but Serge Ibaka joined Harden with another underwhelming performance of nine points and four rebounds. Perkins and Nick Collison only had two apiece and Sefolosha put up a goose egg, meaning the Heat had a huge advantage in their supporting cast, an aspect of this matchup that was supposed to be an area of leverage for the Thunder. But when it came down to it, no one but Durant and Westbrook had a consistent impact and the Thunder never had a third player step up and score like Harden did during the regular season. With Harden struggling and the rest of Oklahoma City’s reserves failing to step up, Miami’s perimeter shooters had a tremendous impact and were big-time support behind LeBron’s transcendent series. The Thunder needed to hit threes and they needed to stop one if not two members of the big three (especially if their role players were going to disappear) to win, but were unable to do either for the majority of the series.

After such a dominant run to the Finals, it was a disappointing finish for KD and the Thunder. But they’re young, talented and now have experience, so you can expect they will be back next year.

In truth, the game was a blowout from the second quarter on. But somehow, the Thunder were only down by ten at half, despite giving up a staggering 59 points in the first half. And coming out of the locker room, the Thunder made their intentions clear by cutting the lead to five just a few minutes in. But then the turning point of the game arrived, and although it was just a small fast break turnover, it proved to be the catalyst for LeBron and the Heat to take control and win the NBA title. Down by five, the Thunder had a fast break opportunity after Durant blocked LeBron, but instead of passing to Westbrook on the wing, Durant tried to dribble through two defenders and lost the ball. The turnover led to another three from Mario Chalmers, which fired up the crowd and stopped the Thunder’s run and momentum. Then Wade blocked a Sefolosha 3-point attempt and Shane Battier knocked down a three to extend the lead back to 11. From then on, the Heat could not be stopped. Whether it was LeBron attacking the basket with little resistance or Miller knocking down 3-pointers, the Thunder’s defense couldn’t stop the Heat’s relentless attack in the third as they dropped 36 points and five 3-pointers.

I incorrectly predicted that the Thunder would take the NBA Finals in six games, but the inexperience of OKC and the indomitable will of LeBron proved to be too much, especially when coupled with that annoying 2-3-2 Finals format (yes, I will keep complaining about it. Why have the entire postseason in the 2-2-1-1-1 format and then switch it up and give so much of an advantage to the away team? I’m not saying Oklahoma City would have won under the other format, but we might have been treated to one or two more fantastic clashes between these two teams if the format made sense). The Thunder are an extremely young team and if they can somehow hold on to James Harden and Serge Ibaka, they have nowhere to go but up. The Thunder have advanced further into the postseason each year for the past four years: they didn’t make the playoffs in 2009, they lost in the first round in 2010, they lost in the Western Conference Finals in 2011 and they lost in the Finals this year. If they keep improving with their young and talented lineup, we could have a dynasty on our hands, especially now that they have experience and the pain that comes with losing in the championship. At the end of the day, however, the 2012 NBA Finals were about LeBron James. LeBron silenced a lot of critics by sealing his dominant playoff run with a triple-double to win his first championship, if only for one night. After nine years in the league filled with scrutiny, doubters, hype, ridicule, haters and unrealistic expectations, LeBron finally won himself a championship ring. While many will still point to the Decision and call him a sellout for taking a much easier path to the Finals, the fact remains that LeBron cemented his place among the greats with well-earned NBA Finals and MVP trophies. The Thunder have a promising future, but the best player in basketball finally got his ring, and hopefully the LeBron haters will be quiet for a little while. And as LeBron James said himself, “It’s about damn time.”

Like him or not, you’ve gotta respect him now. LeBron James capped off a tremendous postseason run with a triple-double in Game to win his first NBA title and NBA Finals MVP award.

One thought on “LeBron James Grabs First NBA Title As Heat Trounce Thunder To Win 2012 Finals

  1. Pingback: NBA Finals Series Recap | Bourguet's BasketBlog

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