Dwight Howard’s 2011-12 Season

Dwight Howard’s year started off and for awhile, it looked like it would be a memorable one. Superman had the Magic at the third spot in the East despite carrying a lackluster supporting cast night in and night out. But Howard’s potential MVP season went downhill pretty quick and will forever be scarred in history by a season-long drama that culminated with yesterday’s announcement that he will miss the remainder of the regular season and the entire playoffs for the Magic. The herniated disk in Howard’s back will require surgery and sideline him from contact drills for four months, meaning he’ll be back next season in full health. But after a tumultuous season full of flip-flopping, behind-the-scenes moves, rumors and apparent backstabbing, should Orlando even want him back?

Dwight Howard put his city through hell this season, but Orlando’s been in an uncomfortable position ever since Howard announced he was unhappy there with Stan Van Gundy. Then management started catering to his every whim in order to appease their spoiled but lovable superstar. They brought in Glen Davis and Gilbert Arenas last year to make him happy, shipping off the now-valuable Brandon Bass to Boston. They most likely bent over backwards before the trade deadline this year to try and bring someone else in to appease Superman. They allegedly told him he’d have managerial powers beyond that of a player, effectively being able to decide the fate of both Van Gundy and GM Otis Smith at the end of the season. Ever since Howard made his discontent and desire to be traded known to the public, Magic management has has done everything but appoint him as head coach and GM in order to get him to stay. Which isĀ still not guaranteed. Enough is enough.

Now I’m not one of those who immediately jumped on the “Blame Howard!” bandwagon when the Magic’s season first started to take a turn for the worse. I didn’t think he was faking his injury or using it as a form of protest after Van Gundy publicly threw him under the bus. Yesterday’s report describing the severity of his injury should prove those rumors to be false. I still don’t know for sure whether or not Howard has to power to decide the fate of Orlando’s head coach and GM. And I understand Howard’s frustration with his team and his coach. If you were a once-in-a-lifetime superstar, would you want to play for the sarcastic Van Gundy surrounded by a bunch of role players who most likely wouldn’t even start for some of the better teams in the league? J.J. Reddick, Jameer Nelson, Hedo Turkoglu, Jason Richardson and even Ryan Anderson are all quality role players and outside shooters at times, but those aren’t the players you build a championship team around. So everyone should ease up off of Dwight Howard a little bit. But it’s just a bit, and that bit ends there.

Howard played through the pain and made his back worse to prove to his team that he wasn't quitting on them. That's gotta be worth something.

What we’ve seen from Howard this season has been downright despicable at times. This isn’t the kind of behavior you want to see out of any player on your team, let alone your franchise star. Howard has vehemently denied his involvement in management, he’s denied that he wants Van Gundy gone, he’s denied that he quit on his team and he’s denied that his injury was just an excuse to spite his coach and his teams with all the rumors swirling around him. But Howard is guilty of leaving an entire organization and fan base hanging. He is guilty of flaking back and forth between staying and leaving on the day of the trade deadline. He may be guilty of trying to usurp his head coach who helped develop him into the defensive juggernaut he has become. And while his performance on the court says otherwise, his off-the-court actions, “roll the dice” comments and overall lack of commitment to the city that’s given him so much is just as good as quitting on his team, his fans, his coach and his city. Howard doesn’t understand that he can put up 30 points and 20 rebounds every night for his team, but it won’t make him a team player or a franchise star worth remembering if he’s doing it while looking into where he can play next season.

I think there are a lot of people to blame in this season of melodrama between Dwight Howard and Van Gundy. Howard shouldn’t be orchestrating these managerial moves behind closed doors if he is, just like Van Gundy shouldn’t have said what he said to throw his star player under the bus. You can say all you want about how “that’s just how Van Gundy is” and how he just wants everything to be out in the open, but there are some things you should keep within the family. Telling reporters that Superman wanted him gone was a huge mistake that broke this story open again.

When reports surfaced Thursday morning that Howard wouldn’t play anymore for Stan Van Gundy, I didn’t know what to think. I hesitated on writing about it or passing out judgement until the full story was revealed, and thankfully, Howard furiously denied the latest rumors again and the real report that he required season-ending surgery on his back came out. Never mind the fact that his back got a lot worse because he played through the injury, which happened after people questioned his dedication to his team and the game with that mailed-in performance (the day Van Gundy called him out). Never mind that before all the trade deadline drama and Van Gundy’s foolish mistake, the Magic were playing pretty well behind a terrific season from Howard that deserved MVP consideration. I think that Howard tarnished his legacy in both Orlando and the NBA this season. Some of what ruined his reputation is fair and he should bare the blame for the things he did wrong, but there are some things that Van Gundy and Orlando’s management should have handled better that are unfairly placed on Superman. It will be interesting to see where Van Gundy and Howard end up next season, but for now, blame Dwight for what Dwight did and don’t buy into the rumors until the full story is unveiled. Because things are way too political and deceptive down in Orlando right now to know fact from fiction. Orlando fans should want Dwight Howard back, even if he’s on thin ice. Given the choice between Howard and Van Gundy, they’d be foolish not to pick Howard. But one thing is for sure: lf Dwight Howard is in an Orlando Magic uniform next year, he’s going to have to bust his ass to move up from Clark Kent to Superman again.

Howard's 2011-12 season will be forever stained by all the drama and flip-flopping. But Magic fans should want him back if he's committed to winning for them again. We'll have to wait it out to see.

About these ads

One thought on “Dwight Howard’s 2011-12 Season

  1. Pingback: Eastern Conference Playoff Predictions | Bourguet's BasketBlog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s