The Kings-Sonics-Thunder Problem

In a move that has one city up in arms, another city rejoicing and the rest of us straddling the border between sympathy and excitement, the Maloof family is nearing a deal that would send the Sacramento Kings to Seattle. Yahoo! Sports reported yesterday that the deal was nearly complete and that the Kings would be sold for approximately $500 million to a group led by investor Chris Hansen and Microsoft chairman Steve Ballmer. ESPN has reported that the deal is not close to being done and that the Maloofs are still uncertain about whether or not they even want to sell the team, but considering their poor track record for doing all they can to prevent the franchise from leaving Sacramento, it’s hard to picture the deal not going through. There’s still a chance for Kings fans to keep their team in town, but what happens if the deal does go through?

There are a few angles to this news, and I feel everyone needs to be aware of them all. For Seattle basketball fans, this is tremendous news. The downright despicable way the SuperSonics left the city for Oklahoma City means they have a right to be happy that they may be getting their beloved franchise back. And of all the basketball cities in the country, no one deserves a new NBA team more than Seattle. When you combine a loyal fanbase with a rich basketball tradition that may soon be restored and returned to Seattle with the unfortunate events that led to the Sonics’ exit, it’s hard to deny them the right to be excited. And as an NBA fan who felt a lot of disappointment for the city and the league in general when Seattle’s basketball team was gone, the news that basketball may be returning is news to celebrate, even if it certainly isn’t the way anyone would have liked to see it.

It's great that we may finally see the Seattle SuperSonics again. But there's more to it than that.

It’s great that we may finally see the Seattle SuperSonics again. But there’s more to it than that.

However, as awesome as it would be to see the SuperSonics’ franchise and history restored, NBA fans who don’t reside in Seattle would be wise to avoid openly celebrating just yet. This move would have really excited me if it didn’t come at the expense of another great basketball city with equally despicable owners. In the same way Sam Presti crapped on the entire city of Seattle, so too have the Maloofs crapped on Sacramento every step of the way as the city has fought to keep its team where it belongs. From the Virginia Beach talks to the new plan drafted by Sacramento that was suddenly and inexplicably turned down by the Maloofs, Kings fans have every reason to resent their owners.

From a history and records perspective, this constant mixing and moving and relocating of NBA franchises we’ve seen over the past few years brings up a fair amount of conflict. Would the SuperSonics get their history back or would Oklahoma City keep it? Should the SuperSonics adopt the Kings’ history and records as their own like OKC did? What would we do with the Kings’ history if Seattle does get the Sonics’ history back? And where should the jerseys of Gary Payton, Shawn Kemp, Chris Webber, Mike Bibby, Kevin Durant and the rest eventually hang? In my opinion Sacramento should hold on to the Kings’ records for the future, Oklahoma City should have their own records and the Thunder should give Seattle’s history back, but that’s a conversation that will likely be way more convoluted than it needs to be.

In recent years, the Kings have been a terrible team with young talent was never fully realized, inconsistent coaching and a star player with major attitude problems. But the rich history of Kings basketball and the loyal fanbase that have fought for their team (despite the fact that their team has been appallingly bad for years now) speaks volumes about how great a basketball city Sacramento is. Who can forget Mike Bibby, Vlade Divac, Chris Webber and the Kings team that took the Los Angeles Lakers to the edge in a disappointing and controversial seven-game series for the 2002 Western Conference Finals? If not for some terrible (and probably corrupt) officiating in Game 6 and horrible free-throw shooting in Game 7, the Kings would have contended for a championship! It’s only natural to be happy to have one of the NBA’s loved franchises back, but we should also realize that if this move goes through, the Sacramento Kings are the new Seattle SuperSonics in the sense that we’ll ALL be nostalgically wanting them back soon enough.

Whether you're a Kings fan is irrelevant. If you're a basketball fan, the Kings disbanding shouldn't make you happy.

Whether you’re a Kings fan is irrelevant. If you’re a basketball fan, the Sacramento Kings leaving for another city shouldn’t make you happy. Even if we might get the SuperSonics back.

Which brings me to you, Seattle basketball fans. I’m not going to go as far as calling you hypocrites like others have done, but it’s time to point something out. If this deal goes through and you end up getting your beloved Sonics back, it’s time to let go of your hatred for the Oklahoma City Thunder. You can still resent Presti and the people responsible for moving your franchise away in the first place, but you had no right to be angry at the Thunder, at Oklahoma City fans, at Kevin Durant or at anybody else during this whole time. No one’s saying you should have supported the Thunder, but blaming them for the move was just looking for a scapegoat to deal with the pain. And if you get the Sonics back, you DEFINITELY don’t have that right. Because even though it wasn’t your decision to take the Kings away from Sacramento, you of all people know how it feels to hate another city for taking your team away. Do you feel responsible for the Kings leaving? Do you feel guilty or deserving of Sacramento’s anger because you will have their team now? No? Then now you understand why your anger at Oklahoma City was never entirely acceptable.

Likewise, Sacramento fans, don’t resent the city of Seattle for the move. Unfortunately, you now understand what they went through and that the real blame lies with your insufferable owner. However, the city of Seattle should give you hope. Not because anyone expects you to cheer for the new team there, but because if Seattle can get their team back, maybe one day down the road Sacramento can too. I truly feel sorry for Kings fans. It doesn’t matter that they’re at the bottom of the Western Conference and have been there are the better part of the last decade. The Kings were a great franchise and even if they hadn’t been, any one of the 30 NBA squads leaving their city for another would be regrettable. I hope that Sacramento will keep its drive for an NBA team alive, because just like the SuperSonics, maybe one day the Kings will come home again.

It's time to let go of the resentment, Seattle fans. Because Sacramento has just as much reason be resent you now.

It’s time to let go of the resentment, Seattle fans. Because if the deal goes through, Sacramento has just as much reason be resent you.

Advertisements

Miami Closes Out Knicks At Home

After looking flat and failing to sweep the Knicks at Madison Square Garden in Game 4, LeBron James and the Miami Heat left nothing to chance and dominated New York at home with a 106-94 victory to end to close out the series in five games. Carmelo Anthony led the Knicks with 35 points and eight rebounds, but didn’t get enough help on the offensive end from his teammates, and New York exited the playoffs immediately following their celebrated Game 4 win that snapped an NBA record 13 consecutive playoff loses.

LeBron James led Miami with 29 points, eight rebounds and seven assists. James didn’t shoot the lights out, but he got to the free throw line 15 times and only missed two to add to his total. The Heat jumped out to a lead in the first half and never let it go after that, taking an 11-point advantage at halftime and extending it to 14 by the end of the third. James led the way for the Heat, but it was an all-around team effort from Miami that prevented the Knicks’ defense from getting the stops they needed to win the game. With Baron Davis out with a severe knee injury, Mike Bibby moved into the starting lineup. Miami took advantage of Bibby’s inability to defend their guards as Mario Chalmers had 10 points and Mike Miller chipped in three 3-pointers for nine points off the bench. Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh had 19 points apiece to complement James, once again overwhelming one-dimensional Knicks attack with the balance of Miami’s big three and some contributions off the bench. For the Knicks, the one-handed Amare wasn’t able to duplicate his impressive 20-point, 10-rebound performance from Game 4 and finished with just 14 points and four rebounds. Tyson Chandler grabbed 11 boards but had just seven points. And J.R. Smith, who was once a huge contributor off the bench, continued his abysmal shooting streak with a 3-of-15 night off the bench.

Melo had another good shooting night, but the Knicks’ defense couldn’t get the stops they needed to hang around.

For the Knicks, the series was a disappointing end for a team that entered the playoffs as one of the hottest teams in the East. But despite being knocked out of the first round in just five games, New York has a bright future and shouldn’t hang their heads about their performance; after all, they were playing without quite a few key players that would have definitely made them more competitive. Jeremy Lin wasn’t on the court because of a knee injury, Amare Stoudemire missed a game after slicing his hand open, Iman Shumpert tore his ACL in Game 1 and Baron Davis tore ligaments in his knee in Game 4. The injury-depleted Knicks never really got a chance to gel this season because those injuries kept their three best players (Melo, Amare and Lin) off the court at separate times. They dealt with a coach who wasn’t a good fit for the team, they battled rumors about Melo’s interest in playing in New York and they handled all the attention that Linsanity brought. This was a team with high expectations put on them by the media and the fans, which is why being dismantled by the Heat seemed so disappointing. But in reality, Miami was and still is the favorite to win the Eastern Conference, while the Knicks never had sufficient time to build chemistry and were missing a number of key players.

For the Heat, this victory was dominant but nothing that we shouldn’t have expected. Miami was supposed to win this series convincingly, especially with no Lin, Shumpert and Amare (for one game). LeBron James put on impressive performances and the Heat’s big three proved to be too much for the Knicks’ lone superstar. The Heat now face a much better team in the second round in the Indiana Pacers, who have been convinced all year they are destined for more than what people expect out of them. The Pacers are my sleeper team, but a matchup with the Heat definitely favors Miami in every area except in the paint (thanks to Roy Hibbert). But the one area of concern that could show up in Miami’s future playoff games is how they handle crunch time in a close contest. With the game on the line in Game 4, LeBron James was stuck in a corner while Dwyane Wade dribbled around, lost the ball and hoisted a fadeaway 3-pointer at the buzzer. If this is the extent of Miami’s last-second strategy, they will fall short of winning a championship for the second year in a row and could possibly even fall to the Pacers if they don’t take them seriously. Erik Spoelstra has to recognize that this is LeBron’s team now, and despite the fact that the sports world has completely condemned his ability to perform with the game on the line, LeBron can get to the rim easier than anyone in the league and should be given the ball in a potential game-winning situation. If the Heat develop a pattern of not giving the ball when things get tight against an easier competitor like the Knicks, what’s going to happen when they face a title contender or even the dangerous Pacers and the pressure is on? Time will tell, but unless LeBron is given an opportunity to build his confidence with the game on the line, we could see another disappearing act when the going gets tough.

LeBron James and the Heat were too much for an injury-plagued Knicks side, but there has to be concern about what will happen against better teams when the game is on the line.

Knicks End Playoff Drought

The New York Knicks ended an NBA record 13-game playoff losing streak and avoided a first round sweep by edging the Miami Heat in a 89-87 Game 4 victory today. Carmelo Anthony finally had an efficient shooting night, shooting over 50 percent to lead the Knicks with 41 points, 6 rebounds and 4 assists. Amare Stoudemire, who played with padding on his injured left hand after missing Game 3, notched 20 points and 10 rebounds in his return.

After a poor first half, Melo and the Knicks made a third quarter run to enter the final period with a three point lead. The Heat didn’t exactly look like they had the killer instinct to put New York away and the Knicks capitalized on it, even though no one other than Anthony and Stoudemire scored more than seven points. J.R. Smith, who scored those seven points, had an appalling 3-for-15 shooting night and Baron Davis went down in the third quarter in the middle of New York’s run, dislocating his right kneecap. Thankfully, Mike Bibby stepped in and hit a few big 3-pointers to keep the Knicks on top. But even though it was a much-needed win for a franchise that hasn’t had much to celebrate over the years, the likely reality is that the Heat will advance in five games. With the series shifting back to Miami and the Heat wanting to get as much rest as possible before the second round, they should return to their business-like mentality and play much better in Game 5.

Carmelo Anthony dropped 41 points and led the Knicks to a Game 4 win over the Heat.

LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh led their team in Game 4, but lacked the championship mentality to put this inferior team away and get some extended rest time with a sweep. James and Wade came alive in the fourth quarter, but by then it was too late. But even with the Heat’s lackadaisical Game 4 performance, even with Melo dropping 40 and even with Amare back on the court and playing well, the Knicks still only won by two points. So as happy a moment as it was for New York to win a playoff game and avoid being swept by LeBron and the Heat, all signs point to an absolute blowout in Game 5 in Miami. Just because Melo finally shot the ball well doesn’t mean he’ll do it again; just because Amare meshed well with Melo and was able to contribute while favoring one hand doesn’t mean it’ll happen again; and just because the Heat failed to come out with a finisher’s mentality doesn’t mean they’ll do so at home.

Miami should have swept this series. Not to take anything away from the Knicks, but there’s little excuse for letting Melo go for 40 and allowing a one-handed Amare Stoudemire to put up 20. There’s no excuse for losing the a New York team without Jeremy Lin and Iman Shmpert. It’s true that the Knicks had a lot more to play for and benefitted from an enthusiastic and victory-hungry home crowd, but if LeBron James wants to become a leader for a championship team, he needs to elevate his game in potential series-clinching moments like these. LeBron has worked hard to prove naysayers wrong and in today’s game he actually played well in the fourth quarter to keep Miami in it. But what should have been LeBron’s moment to take over, win the game and send the entire Madison Square Garden home empty-handed and heavy-hearted was stolen by Dwayne Wade’s ridiculous 3-point attempt at the buzzer. At the beginning of the season, I could understand why the Heat would stick LeBron in the corner and leave the last-minute duties to D-Wade. But LeBron has become the leader of this team with an MVP-caliber season and was playing much better at the end of this game than anyone on the floor for Miami. Believe it or not, Wade should have given the ball up to LeBron and let him decide the fate of the game. But the fact that LeBron didn’t demand it is a little worrisome; he seemed perfectly content with Wade’s decision and shot selection afterward. In a close game, the way LeBron failed to rise to the occasion and allowed his team’s fate to be decided by someone else could come back to haunt the Miami Heat against a better opponent.

The loss really doesn’t matter other than ending the Knicks’ playoff drought, but should we be concerned that LeBron didn’t get the ball at the end?