LeBron James Grabs First NBA Title As Heat Trounce Thunder To Win 2012 Finals

There are some nights when winning is an option and a necessity. And then there are some nights when the other team won’t be denied and nothing can be done to stop it. After an assertive Game 5 performance that won LeBron James his first NBA championship, the Heat taught the Thunder exactly how helpless that feels. On a night where nothing went Oklahoma City’s way, the Heat took matters into their own hands and buried the Thunder with one of the more dominant third quarter runs in NBA Finals history. Between LeBron James putting up a triple-double and the Heat knocking down 14 3-pointers, the young and inexperienced Thunder had no chance as Miami closed out the series with a 121-106 win to end the series in five games on their home floor.

After taking a 3-1 series lead, history wasn’t on OKC’s side, as no team in NBA Finals history has ever comeback from that deficit to win the title. But Miami provided the exclamation point on that stat with an unstoppable shooting display in the third that stopped the Thunder’s comeback in its tracks and put the game out of reach before the fourth quarter even started. LeBron James was magnificent throughout and showed greater maturity and poise in Miami’s clincher, notching 26 points, 13 assists and 11 rebounds in an all-around impressive performance. But even more key was Miami’s 3-point shooting. After averaging just six 3-pointers per game during the season, the Heat dropped an astounding 14 on the Thunder in Game 5, led by Mike Miller’s incredible 7-of-8 shooting night from beyond the arc. Miller, who hadn’t made a 3-pointer in the entire series, finished with 23 points off the bench and provided the same critical spark from 3-point range that Shane Battier, Mario Chalmers and Norris Cole had given throughout the series. It almost seemed like the regular season was just one gigantic bluff from Miami’s reserve players, who suddenly became unstoppable 3-point threats in the Finals. Battier hit three threes to finish with 11, Chalmers hit two and added 10 points and Cole added his only triple to completely sink Oklahoma City’s hopes of sending the series back home for Game 6.

LeBron was terrific again, but Mike Miller’s contributions were nothing short of essential in Miami’s Game 5 win to take the crown.

Make no mistake, although the officiating was an issue at times during this series, it wasn’t in Game 5; the Heat definitely earned their championship and proved themselves to be the best team of the 2012 NBA Playoffs. LeBron James capped off one of the more magnificent postseason performances we’ve seen in the last decade with a triple-double that proved himself to be clutch in addition to illustrating how valuable experience is at this stage. And although the focus was all on LeBron, Dwyane Wade deserves a lot of credit for the Heat’s convincing victory over the Thunder in this series. Wade finished with 20 points and eight rebounds in Game 5, a huge lift for Miami after he struggled at times during the Heat’s postseason run. And Chris Bosh, the third member of Miami’s big three, showed just how important he is by clogging up the paint and finally finding his shooting touch. Bosh had 24 points, seven rebounds and two blocks, dominating Kendrick Perkins in the paint and making it difficult for Russell Wesbrook and Kevin Durant to score in the paint. Finally, Erik Spoelstra completely out-coached Scott Brooks. I’ve been one of many who have criticized Spoelstra for being an ineffective coach, but against the Thunder, his rotations were superior, forcing the Thunder to play small which gave the Heat a huge advantage on the perimeter. Between Miami’s big three playing consistently great basketball and Miami’s role players stepping up and hitting a multitude of perimeter shots, the Thunder had no chance.

Oklahoma City had a memorable run and looked like clear favorites in this series, but had problems scoring on Miami’s stifling defense under the immense pressure of playing in their first NBA Finals appearance. Experience was definitely a huge factor, as the Thunder looked like a very different team from the one that steamrolled Dallas, LA and San Antonio on their way to the Finals. Kevin Durant led all scorers with 32 points and and 11 rebounds, but it still wasn’t enough as Westbrook struggled after his amazing 43-point performance in Game 4. Westbrook finished just only 19 points on 4-of-20 shooting. Durant also didn’t get much help from James Harden, OKC’s Sixth Man of the Year who shied away from the spotlight for the majority of the series. Harden finished with 19 points, but most of them came in garbage time when the outcome of the game was all but decided. Derek Fisher showed up, adding 11 points off the bench, but Serge Ibaka joined Harden with another underwhelming performance of nine points and four rebounds. Perkins and Nick Collison only had two apiece and Sefolosha put up a goose egg, meaning the Heat had a huge advantage in their supporting cast, an aspect of this matchup that was supposed to be an area of leverage for the Thunder. But when it came down to it, no one but Durant and Westbrook had a consistent impact and the Thunder never had a third player step up and score like Harden did during the regular season. With Harden struggling and the rest of Oklahoma City’s reserves failing to step up, Miami’s perimeter shooters had a tremendous impact and were big-time support behind LeBron’s transcendent series. The Thunder needed to hit threes and they needed to stop one if not two members of the big three (especially if their role players were going to disappear) to win, but were unable to do either for the majority of the series.

After such a dominant run to the Finals, it was a disappointing finish for KD and the Thunder. But they’re young, talented and now have experience, so you can expect they will be back next year.

In truth, the game was a blowout from the second quarter on. But somehow, the Thunder were only down by ten at half, despite giving up a staggering 59 points in the first half. And coming out of the locker room, the Thunder made their intentions clear by cutting the lead to five just a few minutes in. But then the turning point of the game arrived, and although it was just a small fast break turnover, it proved to be the catalyst for LeBron and the Heat to take control and win the NBA title. Down by five, the Thunder had a fast break opportunity after Durant blocked LeBron, but instead of passing to Westbrook on the wing, Durant tried to dribble through two defenders and lost the ball. The turnover led to another three from Mario Chalmers, which fired up the crowd and stopped the Thunder’s run and momentum. Then Wade blocked a Sefolosha 3-point attempt and Shane Battier knocked down a three to extend the lead back to 11. From then on, the Heat could not be stopped. Whether it was LeBron attacking the basket with little resistance or Miller knocking down 3-pointers, the Thunder’s defense couldn’t stop the Heat’s relentless attack in the third as they dropped 36 points and five 3-pointers.

I incorrectly predicted that the Thunder would take the NBA Finals in six games, but the inexperience of OKC and the indomitable will of LeBron proved to be too much, especially when coupled with that annoying 2-3-2 Finals format (yes, I will keep complaining about it. Why have the entire postseason in the 2-2-1-1-1 format and then switch it up and give so much of an advantage to the away team? I’m not saying Oklahoma City would have won under the other format, but we might have been treated to one or two more fantastic clashes between these two teams if the format made sense). The Thunder are an extremely young team and if they can somehow hold on to James Harden and Serge Ibaka, they have nowhere to go but up. The Thunder have advanced further into the postseason each year for the past four years: they didn’t make the playoffs in 2009, they lost in the first round in 2010, they lost in the Western Conference Finals in 2011 and they lost in the Finals this year. If they keep improving with their young and talented lineup, we could have a dynasty on our hands, especially now that they have experience and the pain that comes with losing in the championship. At the end of the day, however, the 2012 NBA Finals were about LeBron James. LeBron silenced a lot of critics by sealing his dominant playoff run with a triple-double to win his first championship, if only for one night. After nine years in the league filled with scrutiny, doubters, hype, ridicule, haters and unrealistic expectations, LeBron finally won himself a championship ring. While many will still point to the Decision and call him a sellout for taking a much easier path to the Finals, the fact remains that LeBron cemented his place among the greats with well-earned NBA Finals and MVP trophies. The Thunder have a promising future, but the best player in basketball finally got his ring, and hopefully the LeBron haters will be quiet for a little while. And as LeBron James said himself, “It’s about damn time.”

Like him or not, you’ve gotta respect him now. LeBron James capped off a tremendous postseason run with a triple-double in Game to win his first NBA title and NBA Finals MVP award.

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NBA Finals Game 5 Preview

After a furious second half rally that won Game 1 at home, the Oklahoma City Thunder were flying high and had a 1-0 lead on the series. Three games later, they’re fighting to keep their championship hopes alive by becoming the first team in NBA history to come back from a 3-1 deficit in the Finals. Miami took Game 2 on the road after a questionable no-call at the end of the game before proceeding to defend home-court in two straight games. Because of the pesky 2-3-2 Finals format (which gives WAY too much advantage to the away team, by the way), the Heat have the prime opportunity to end the Thunder’s impressive season and give LeBron James his first Larry O’Brien trophy on Miami’s own floor. Obviously, Oklahoma City doesn’t want that to happen, but history isn’t exactly on their side since the previous 30 teams to attempt such a monumental comeback in a series have all failed.

Heading into Game 5 in Miami, with the Heat having a chance to close out the NBA Finals at home, do the Thunder really stand a chance? They’ve lost three in a row now and don’t look like the same team that came back from a 2-0 deficit against the Spurs to win the West. No team has EVER won the NBA Finals after trailing 3-1, and since the Finals format was changed to the 2-3-2 format in 1985, no team has even extended the series to Game 7. Oklahoma City has come back from two games down before in these playoffs, but this time they’ll have to win an elimination game in Miami, where the Heat are now 10-2 during the playoffs this year. Then they would have to go back to Oklahoma City and face the team that has physically outmatched them, the only team that has beaten the Thunder in Chesapeake Arena. And they’d have to do that twice. The odds are certainly not in the Thunder’s favor, but if OKC somehow does get the win in Game 5 on the road, I don’t know any Miami fan that will be comfortable with the series shifting back to Oklahoma City, where the Thunder have only lost one game in the postseason. For the Thunder, James Harden absolutely has to show up. The Thunder have been so terrific throughout the playoffs up until now because they’ve had a third scorer to back up Durant and Westbrook, but they haven’t enjoyed that luxury in the Finals so far. Harden’s been completely absent in this series after thrilling spectators all year long with his 3-point shooting, relentless attacks to the basket and of course, the beard. But so far, Harden’s shied away from the spotlight on the big stage and the Thunder have been losing games. That’s got to change for Oklahoma City to take Game 5 on the road.

If James Harden’s struggles continue, the Thunder are done. But if Harden can pick up his game again and make an impact on offense, they will send the series back to Oklahoma City for Game 6.

But the improvements don’t stop there. Westbrook has to hit shots like he did in Game 4’s memorable performance, and although no one can expect another legendary performance like this, he needs to consistently hit shots. Kevin Durant needs to take over in the second half like his did in Games 1 and 2. Believe it or not, 29 points isn’t good enough for Durant. He needs to completely dominate from beyond the 3-point line and in the paint. Superstars need to step up in the playoffs, and an elimination game makes that need even greater. Durant can’t just have a great game; he needs to drop 35-40 points and have a phenomenal game. The Oklahoma City Thunder need to execute down the stretch, as they’ve been outplayed in the fourth quarter for the second game in a row. They need to make 3-point shots, as they’ve shot 21 of 77 (about 27 percent) from downtown in the series. They need to force referees to blow their whistles by attacking the basket. And if Harden continues to falter in the spotlight, the Thunder need a third scorer to step up like Mario Chalmers did tonight. Serge Ibaka and Thabo Sefolosha have been extremely quiet the last few games. They were huge pieces of the equation that bested the Spurs in six games, but have done very little to slow down Miami’s prolific scorers or counter them with points of their own. The Thunder have had problems keeping two big men on the floor at a time in the series because Erik Spoelstra has smartly kept a small lineup on the floor. This has forced Scott Brooks to do the same, taking away Oklahoma City’s advantage of Ibaka and Perkins in the paint against lackluster scorers like Udonis Haslem and the other centers that now occupy Miami’s bench. But even though the Thunder have a lot to improve on, closing out a team like OKC won’t be easy for the Heat. The Thunder are young, athletic, resilient and now their backs are up against the wall. The last thing Miami wants is for this series to shift back to Oklahoma City, because even though no team has ever come back from a 3-1 deficit to win the Finals, if there ever was such a team, I’ve gotta think it would be the Thunder.

For the Heat, they are one game away from the crown. LeBron is so close to winning his first ring and clearly isn’t playing nervous like he did in last year’s Finals. Every game has been close in this series so far, so there’s no room for shrinking from the moment, which has been LeBron’s defining characteristic in Miami until this postseason. LeBron has to continue to play his dominant style of basketball, Wade needs to show up once again, and Miami’s perimeter shooters, who have traded great games up until this point, need to show up for just one more. All Miami really has to do is keeping the same ball they’ve played in the last three games. Shane Battier, Mario Chalmers and Norris Cole have all been big for the Heat in a few games by knocking down perimeter shots and spreading Oklahoma City’s defense even thiner than before. With Chris Bosh not getting back into the full swing of the game yet, the Heat need that third scorer to complement LeBron and Dwyane Wade, which is something Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook haven’t been getting out of James Harden. If Miami can have a third member to back up their two superstars in the scoring column, the Thunder are in trouble unless Harden harnesses the power of that magic beard again. LeBron has been magnificent in this series and Wade has rightful deferred to him in the biggest moments of games, but now they’ll need him to be extraordinary one more time. I’m assuming that despite going down in Game 4 with leg cramps, he’ll be back on the floor and at 100 percent for the biggest game of his career, meaning he’ll need another concentrated effort. Getting wins is one thing, closing out a talented and desperate team to win a championship is another thing. If he is able to do it, LeBron will silence a lot of haters and rightfully win his first ring. But if he doesn’t, and if the Heat drop Game 5 at home, they will have missed out on a prime opportunity to go for the kill and open the door of conversation for doubters predicting that the Thunder might be capable of such a momentous comeback. And to be honest, if the Heat don’t win Game 5, I might be one of them. Despite dropping Game 2 at home, the Thunder are still 10-1 at home and you have to think if OKC somehow sends this thing back home, they will be greeted by a delirious crowd that will believe those last two wins are possible. The Heat need to end this series and not even mess around with the inevitable “LeBron and the Heat are going to choke in the Finals again” or “Oklahoma City might be able to pull this thing off!” conversations. The Heat have put themselves in fantastic position, but there can be no room for error if they want to avoid risking the biggest collapse in NBA Finals history.

LeBron is one game away from his first title. If ever there were a time to prove everyone wrong and be clutch, it’ll be Game 5.

Celtics Snag Road Win, Take 3-2 Lead

When the Celtics fell into a 2-0 hole in Miami against LeBron James and the Heat, the Eastern Conference Finals looked like they would be wrapping up early. And even when they defied expectations by defending home court and knotting the series at 2-2, everyone assumed the Heat would just take Game 5 at home and have two chances to finish Boston off. But after a 94-90 win in a pivotal Game 5 in Miami, the Boston Celtics look like a team to be taken seriously again.

Kevin Garnett led the Celts with 26 points and 11 rebounds and Paul Pierce scored eight of his 19 points in the fourth quarter, including a dagger 3-pointer over LeBron James to give Boston a four-point lead with less than a minute to play. Pierce’s big-time bucket was reminiscent of James Harden’s clutch three that sunk the Spurs in Game 5 and helped Boston win its third straight game to take a 3-2 lead on the series. The Celtics never led until the third quarter, when they went on a 15-1 run as the Heat once again went through a dry spell. Miami didn’t have a field goal for more than five minutes and once they fell behind, the veteran Celtics held on to their narrow lead, which was particularly impressive since Boston’s stars were struggling from the field up to that point. Rajon Rondo had only seven points on 3-of-15 shooting, Ray Allen had 13 points on 2-of-9 shooting (he knocked down eight free throws) and Pierce was only 6-for-19. However, Garnett’s brilliance, Pierce’s fourth quarter resolve and Boston’s role players stepping up proved to be too much. Mickael Pietrus had 13 points off the bench while Brandon Bass had another solid performance with 10.

Kevin Garnett had another all-around dominant performance and Paul Pierce came alive in the fourth to give the Boston Celtics the critical road win in Game 5 and take a 3-2 lead.

The Heat tried to get Dwyane Wade going early on and for the most part, it worked, as LeBron and Wade combined for 14 of the Heat’s first 16 points. Unfortunately, Wade was nowhere to be found again until the fourth quarter. LeBron led Miami with 30 points and 13 rebounds while Wade pitched in 27, 14 of which came in the fourth. The Heat also got an initial boost from Chris Bosh, who made his return to action with nine points and seven rebounds in 14 minutes off the bench. Unfortunately for the Heat, Erik Spoelstra didn’t play him much down the stretch as Miami watched a perfectly winnable Game 5 slip away. Although Wade was absent until the fourth quarter and LeBron was dominant until the fourth quarter, they were the only one who put up points for the Heat. Mario Chalmers continued to struggle with his shot and only had nine. Udonis Haslem, who was inserted into the starting lineup, made a poor debut with only three. Shane Battier only put up five and Mike Miller had just three off the bench. In fact, no one scored more than nine for the Heat other than LeBron and Wade. Miami also couldn’t get their hands on a few unlucky 50-50 balls, including one that led to a 3-pointer from Pietrus after Rondo perfectly tipped a phenomenal block from Wade to the wide open man in the corner. And after Pierce’s dagger three, the Celtics hit their free throws and finished off the road win to send the series back to Boston for an elimination Game 6.

The Miami Heat missed a golden opportunity to take back control in this series at home, where they have been nearly unstoppable during the postseason. It’s amazing how much of a difference coaching is making in this series; Doc Rivers is guiding and old and hobbled (but determined and experienced) Celtics team to the Finals while Erik Spoelstra is letting a team with two of the game’s biggest superstars underachieve once again. If the Heat do lose this series, Spoelstra’s job could (and should) be in serious jeopardy. But for now, the Eastern Conference Finals shift back to Boston, where a rocking TD Garden will make things even more difficult for a Heat team struggling to find support outside of LeBron and Wade. Chalmers and Miller need to start knocking down 3-pointers again, Haslem has got to make himself an offensive option and Chris Bosh will need to be ready for extended minutes (Spoelstra’s decision to bench him for the entire fourth quarter of Game 5 was ultimately dumb, but not indefensible; there will be no excuses in Game 6). If Bosh can play like he was before his abdominal injury, he will have a huge impact on the offensive end by putting up points in the paint and on the defensive end by matching up with the formidable Kevin Garnett. But the key to getting such a difficult win on the road in an elimination game will be Dwyane Wade. LeBron James shows up to play every night and has been quietly putting up nearly 30 ppg in the postseason, but Wade has been all too inconsistent in the playoffs this year. When Wade does come to play, the Heat are nearly unstoppable, as evidenced by their two-man demolition of the Indiana Pacers in the second round. Miami needs their supporting cast to step up and knock down perimeter shots and a good game from Bosh would definitely be a plus. But after losing a game where Rondo and Pierce both shot so poorly, the Heat need Wade to go off to force Game 7.

Do LeBron James and Dwyane Wade have what it takes to force a Game 7 in Miami?

Thunder Grab Control, Take Game 5 In San Antonio

The home team has dominated in the Western Conference Finals this year, leaving a lot of doubt as to whether or not the Oklahoma City Thunder had any chance of advancing with two of the series’ final three games in San Antonio. After Kevin Durant and James Harden willed their team to victory on the road in a 106-103 win in Game 5, that might be all but assured.

Durant led Oklahoma City with 27 points, Harden chipped in 20 off the bench and the Thunder withstood a furious rally from Manu Ginobili and the Spurs to take a 3-2 lead with the series shifting back to OKC for an elimination Game 6. The Thunder have now won three straight and will look to close out San Antonio at home, where they are 6-0 in the postseason so far. Ginobil led the Spurs with 34 points, seven assists and six rebounds and he and Tony Parker went on a tear in the second half, but the Thunder will able to cling to a narrow lead after a 13-point advantage dwindled to just two with 50 seconds to play. Parker had 20 but was once again corralled all night by Thabo Sefolosha’s tremendous defense. However, Ginobili’s insertion into the starting lineup for Daniel Green almost proved to be deadly for the Thunder, as the Spurs’ sixth man was nearly unstoppable all night, drilling five 3-pointers and willing his team back into the game in the third and fourth quarters.

Manu Ginobili was masterful, but it wasn’t enough for the Spurs.

Despite foul trouble for Sefolosha, Serge Ibaka and James Harden early on, the Thunder build up a 14-point lead in the first half. Daequan Cook had valuable minutes off the bench with Sefolosha and Harden in foul trouble, knocking down all three of his shots to score eight points in just four minutes of play. However, Ginobili and company stormed back, by minimizing their turnovers during a critical stretch to cut it to eight right before halftime. San Antonio continued their run into the third quarter, taking advantage of sloppy offense and numerous turnovers from the Thunder to take a four-point lead after Ginobili hit back-to-back threes. Unfortunately for San Antonio, just like in Game 4’s masterful performance, Kevin Durant saved his best for the second half, once again warming up in the third and taking control to put his team further ahead. Durant had only five points on 1-of-6 shooting in the first half, but helped his team weather the storm and eventually a 15-4 run overcame a stretch where Ginobili scored 13 of San Antonio’s 15 points. Good defense and a solid shooting stretch from Russell Westbrook (including this mammoth alley-oop) characterized the critical third quarter run, which was capped off by a Durant buzzer-beater that extended OKC’s lead to nine heading into the fourth quarter.

Now the Thunder had built up a nine point lead on the road heading into the fourth before; in Game 1, Oklahoma City was in the exact same situation before allowing Parker and the Spurs to storm back and steal the series opener. And although San Antonio threatened to do the same in Game 5, Harden’s brilliant fourth quarter performance prevented a full on collapse and gave the Thunder the pivotal victory on the road. Harden scored 12 of his 20 points in the fourth, draining three 3-pointers. These included a four-point play that extended the Thunder’s lead to 13 with five minutes to play and the shot of the game, a long-range bomb and dagger three that was the definition of clutch, putting the Thunder up five with 28 seconds to play and effectively sealing the win. But Westbrook turnovers and OKC’s sometimes annoying tendency to not put the ball in the hands of the NBA’s leading scorer resurfaced as the Spurs made a last-ditch effort to comeback. Westbrook had 23 points, 12 assists and big bucket down the stretch to give OKC a four-point advantage when the Spurs looked like they were about to take over, but he also had six turnovers and didn’t get the ball to Durant down the stretch. Some of the blame should lie with Scott Brooks, but the Thunder will need to do a better job of getting the ball to their clutch closer in tight games in the future if they want to advance and win an NBA championship.

Westbrook has struggled with poor shooting and turnovers so far. Will it matter in Game 6?

After Harden’s critical 3-pointer, Ginobili was able to score a quick layup before the Spurs set up a half court press. Another coaching error was committed by Brooks, who should have called a timeout to draw up an inbounds play. Instead, Durant was trapped and threw the ball to Sefolosha, who lost it out of bounds because of great pressure from Kawhi Leonard, giving the Spurs a chance to hit a 3-pointer with 15 seconds to go. Unfortunately for San Antonio, Ginobili couldn’t hit the one that mattered and Durant iced the game with two free throws before Stephen Jackson knocked down a last-second three that didn’t matter.

With Game 6 in Oklahoma City, the Spurs playoff hopes are steadily dwindling. The Thunder have now won three straight and are undefeated at home in the playoffs this year. Switching Sefolosha onto Parker has made a huge difference in the series and the Thunder’s role players have learned how to step up and contribute. In fact, the depth that was one of the Spurs’ greatest assets has begun to fade as Oklahoma City’s bench outscored San Antonio’s 40-22. Without Parker creating havoc in the lane and the Spurs’ bench knocking down threes, Gregg Popovich has had to rely fully on Tim Duncan and Manu Ginobili to carry the load. Ginobili and Duncan (18 points and 12 rebounds) had great games last night, but it wasn’t enough to overcome OKC’s balanced play combined with great games from their big three of Durant, Harden and Westbrook. Now the Spurs face elimination in a hostile road environment, and history isn’t on their side. The last time the Spurs went up 2-0 in the Western Conference Finals, they lost four straight to fall to the Los Angeles Lakers in six. With a youthful and championship-hungry team led by such a high-caliber superstar in Kevin Durant standing in the way, the aging Spurs have little chance now. The Thunder need to finish them off at home (because they certainly don’t want to mess around and let this go to a Game 7 in San Antonio), but I think they will understand the gravity of winning Game 6 at home and my prediction that OKC would advance in six games is looking like it’ll be right on the money.

Since Kevin Durant wasn’t getting looks, James Harden stepped up as OKC’s clutch player for the night, giving them control of the series.

Heat Punish Pacers In Physical Game 5

After the Pacers took a 2-1 series lead, it looked like Indiana was going to be able to run away with this series. Now momentum has completely flopped after the Heat won two games in a row in punishing fashion to take a 3-2 lead. LeBron James and Dwyane Wade put on another two-man show, Danny Granger and David West went down with injuries and Miami physically abused the rest of the Pacers in a 115-83 rout in Game 5.

LeBron James led the Heat with 30 points, 10 rebounds and eight assists and Dwyane Wade added 28 points. Indiana was in the game in the first half as Danny Granger knocked down three 3-pointers early, but after he landed awkwardly on his ankle on another 3-point attempt, he didn’t return and Miami blew the game wide open. Granger had 10 points before leaving the game and no one other than Paul George and David West reached double digits in scoring. George led the Pacers with just 11 points and West had 10. The Heat ended the half on a 8-2 run after Granger went down and then outscored Indiana by 10 in the third as West left the game right before the fourth quarter.

If Granger’s ankle injury hinders him in anyway for Game 6, the Pacers have no chance.

This was Indiana’s worst playoff game by far. They were out-rebounded 49-35, and whoever has won the battle for the boards in this series has won the game. Almost half of Miami’s 43 field goals were in the paint. The Heat racked up 10 blocks compared to Indiana’s three. Roy Hibbert has completely regressed into a non-factor despite his extreme height advantage over anyone on the Miami Heat. The Pacers shot 33 percent from the field compared to Miami’s 67 percent. Shane Battier outscored Indiana’s leading scorer by knocking down four 3-pointers to finish with 13. Granger and West went down with injuries and Granger is now questionable for Game 6 in Indiana. And to top it all off, the Heat banged up the Pacers even more with a couple of cheap fouls that earned suspensions from the league. In the first half, a hard foul from Tyler Hansbrough on Wade appropriately earned a flagrant one foul, which was the correct call because it was harsh, but Hansbrough made a play on the ball. That foul earned retaliation from Udonis Haslem, who clobbered Hansbrough and made no play on the ball. For some unknown reason, the foul didn’t earn a flagrant foul of any kind, even though it was clearly flagrant two material. And later on in the game when the outcome was all but decided, Dexter Pittman found an opportunity to retaliate on Lance Stephenson for making the choke sign in Game 3 as LeBron missed a free throw. Pittman nailed Stevenson in the throat with an elbow as he was crashing the boards and was seen on camera winking after the foul. Haslem earned a one-game suspension and Pittman was given three.

Losing Pittman is pretty irrelevant since he was only playing in garbage time but losing Haslem might be significant if Roy Hibbert ever wakes up. Haslem has been scoring and rebounding pretty well for the Heat off the bench in the last two games, especially in Game 4 when he helped finish off Indiana in the fourth quarter. However, if Granger and West aren’t at 100 percent for Game 8 in Indiana, the Pacers are finished even without Haslem. Although the Pacers’ bench gave them everything they could ask for in Game 5, Indiana’s starting five couldn’t get the job done. George Hill disappeared with only six points and Hibbert was just as bad with eight. The Pacers need to make serious changes in their play for Game 6 or they will be the sleeper team of the 2012 NBA Playoffs that fell short of accomplishing anything truly impressive.

Udonis Haslem was rightfully punished for his dirty foul on Tyler Hansbrough with a one game suspension.

Thunder Finish Lakers Off, Advance To Western Conference Finals

I predicted the Oklahoma City Thunder would finish off the Lakers in six games, but it turns out they were more dangerous than I anticipated. Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook and the Thunder got the job done in five games and made it look relatively easy in the process, either blowing LA out or coming back in the game’s final minutes with a relentless fury that the Lakers couldn’t match. With their convincing 106-90 victory on Monday, the Thunder sent Kobe Bryant and the Lakers home and advanced to their second straight Western Conference Finals.

Russell Westbrook led OKC with 28 points, Kevin Durant followed up with 25 and James Harden added 17 off the bench. No one else reached double digits for the Thunder, but their role players each pitched something in. Serge Ibaka had eight, Nazr Mohammed had seven off the bench, and Kendrick Perkins and Nick Collison each had six. Kobe Bryant led all scorers with a dominant 42 points on 18-of-33 shooting, but as has been the case in this series and the majority of the playoffs, received little help from his teammates. The Lakers were out-rebounded 51-35 as LA’s bigs continued to underachieve. Andrew Bynum finished with just 10 points and four rebounds and Pau Gasol had 16 rebounds but could only muster 14 points, which didn’t help the sentiments that he needs to be shipped off after this season. Kobe looked like the only one who cared and couldn’t carry the burden of having no bench and disappointing stars around him against this tough Thunder team.

Westbrook was a problem for the Lakers all series long, but it was his circus shot that sent Kobe and his disappointing supporting cast home early.

For the Lakers, their inability to compete has to be a little disconcerting. Knowing LA’s history of success and how they’ve been competitive each and every year for such a long time, some offseason moves are going to happen. A year for the Lakers without a championship is a failure in LA’s book and because of how competitive Kobe is, management will be forced to make some changes to give their superstar one more chance to win his sixth ring before he finally retires.

Kobe was able to keep the Lakers relatively even with the Thunder for almost three quarters, but when Russell Westbrook picked off Ramon Sessions’ pass and made a spectacular circus shot for a three-point play, the crowd ignited and Oklahoma City never looked back, outscoring the Lakers by ten in the fourth. Oklahoma City’s two elite superstars and their superb Sixth Man of the Year proved to be too much for LA’s one-man attack, as Kendrick Perkins and Serge Ibaka were able to bother Andrew Bynum and Pau Gasol just enough to limit their contributions. Ramon Sessions was completely underwhelming for the entire series, Steve Blake and the rest of the bench completely disappeared at times and the Thunder will able to storm back in two games to get huge wins. The Thunder will meet the San Antonio Spurs in the Western Conference Finals, which is sure to be a battle between two unstoppable forces; the Thunder have lost one game in the postseason so far and the Spurs have won 18 games straight. This series will really be a pick ’em, but you can be sure whoever comes out of the West will be hard-pressed to not win it all.

Kobe Bryant and the Lakers need to make some changes this summer.

Brandon Bass Gives Boston 3-2 Lead

It wasn’t a member of Boston’s big three that beat the Philadelphia 76ers in Game 5. It also wasn’t Rajon Rondo who gave the Celtics a 3-2 lead heading into Game 6 tonight. But Brandon Bass’ breakout night helped the Celts pull away in the third quarter at home and get a huge victory at home that puts pressure on the Sixers to defend their home court. Bass scored 18 of his playoff career high 27 points in the third, which gave the Celtics a convincing win when combined with solid nights from Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce and Rondo.

Garnett had 20, Rondo had 13 points and 14 assists and Pierce added 16 points. Ray Allen, who moved back into the starting lineup, only had five, but Bass’ big night made up for it. The Celtics also got a big boost off the bench from Greg Stiemsma, who had 10 points and three blocks. Avery Bradley did not play, missing the game because of his dislocated shoulder. Elton Brand led Philadelphia with 19 points but had no answer for Bass on the defensive end. Lavoy Allen had 12 off the bench and Evan Turner, Jrue Holiday and Spencer Hawes all reached double digits in scoring, but the Sixers’ normally stifling defense allowed 101 points for the Celtics. Scoring has never been the Sixers’ strong point, so Bass’ explosion on the offensive end was more than enough to give the Celts a much-needed win.

Brandon Bass lifted the Celtics to victory with a big performance in Game 5.

With Game 6 tonight in Philadelphia, the pressure is now back on the Sixers to stave off elimination and force a decisive Game 7 in Boston. The Sixers have been great at home in the postseason as they find their arena filled with fans that didn’t make their presence well known during the regular season. However, Boston has the experience and knowledge of how to win playoff games, so Philly will have their hands full. Doc Rivers was a top candidate for the Coach of the Year Award and the Celtics should still be favorites to close out the overachieving Sixers tonight.

Philadelphia should be proud of what their team has accomplished this season, and hopefully fans will fill the Sixers’ arena next season after this. But as I’ve mentioned numerous times, Philly only made the second round by virtue of Derrick Rose and Joakim Noah injuries in the first round. They gained confidence after winning the series and have battled with this banged up Boston team, but the Celtics are just too good to pick against. It’s going to take longer than the five games I predicted, but even if the Sixers defend their court and force Game 7, Boston should advance to the Eastern Conference Finals.

The Sixers have their backs against the wall. Can they take Game 6 at home tonight?